What is My DNS Server? – Network Manager and DNS Configuration

dnsdnsmasqnetwork-manageropendns

My /etc/resolv.conf looks like this:

# Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by resolvconf(8)
#     DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE BY HAND -- YOUR CHANGES WILL BE OVERWRITTEN
nameserver 127.0.1.1

# OpenDNS Fallback (configured by Linux Mint in /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/tail).
nameserver 208.67.222.222
nameserver 208.67.220.220   

When I use nslookup, I seem to use 127.0.1.1:

moose@pc08 ~ $ nslookup www.google.com
Server:     127.0.1.1
Address:    127.0.1.1#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:   www.google.com
Address: 173.194.44.17
Name:   www.google.com
Address: 173.194.44.16
Name:   www.google.com
Address: 173.194.44.19
Name:   www.google.com
Address: 173.194.44.18
Name:   www.google.com
Address: 173.194.44.20

But when I right-click on network manager and click on "connection information" I get:

connection information

whois 217.0.43.129 reveals that this belongs to Deutsche Telekom AG, my ISP.

Why does network manager show this information? What DNS server am I currently using?

dnsmasq

Yes, I seem to run dnsmasq:

moose@pc08 ~ $ ps aux | grep dnsmasq
nobody    1479  0.0  0.0   5468  1404 ?        S    14:16   0:00 /usr/sbin/dnsmasq --no-resolv --keep-in-foreground --no-hosts --bind-interfaces --pid-file=/var/run/sendsigs.omit.d/network-manager.dnsmasq.pid --listen-address=127.0.1.1 --conf-file=/var/run/nm-dns-dnsmasq.conf --cache-size=0 --proxy-dnssec --enable-dbus=org.freedesktop.NetworkManager.dnsmasq --conf-dir=/etc/NetworkManager/dnsmasq.d

Best Answer

You are using dnsmasq, a lightweight forwarding DNS server that runs locally under the control of NetworkManager. Dnsmasq forwards DNS queries to the DNS servers whose addresses have been provided by the DHCP server. It is also possible to set these DNS server addresses statically using the Connection Editor.

The dnsmasq executable is provided by the dnsmasq-base package on which the network-manager package depends. There is also a package called simply "dnsmasq" which also depends on dnsmasq-base, but this "dnsmasq" package should only be installed if you want to run dnsmasq independently of NetworkManager in order to take advantage of features other than mere DNS forwarding.

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